THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Blind Justice, James Scott Bell {$0.99}

Sponsored Post

James Scott Bell‘s Frugal Find Under Nine:

Description of Blind Justice:

Jake Denney has hit rock bottom. His wife has left him. He’s drinking again. And his five-year-old daughter is in the middle of it all. When a judge calls him “a disgrace to the legal profession,” Jake starts thinking things might be better for everyone if he wasn’t around anymore.

Then a childhood friend’s mother phones him. Her son, Howie, has been accused of murdering his wife. Jake takes the seemingly hopeless case in a last-ditch effort to save his client and his fading career.

Meanwhile, Howie’s little sister, Lindsay, has grown into a beautiful woman. Though Jake is drawn to her, there’s something about her he doesn’t understand, even though it may be the very thing he needs to reclaim his humanity.

With the evidence mounting against his client, and a web of corruption closing around them both, Jake Denney faces the fight of his life–not only in the courtroom, but in the depths of his own soul.

 

Accolades:

“A fresh take on the territory of Hammett and Chandler.” – Booklist

“Move over John Grisham. James Scott Bell has done it again with Blind Justice. A must read!” – Nancy Moser, author of The Invitation and The Quest

Reviews:

Blind Justice currently has an Amazon reader review rating of 4.5 stars from 28 reviews. Read the reviews here.

 

An excerpt from Blind Justice:

ON THE LAST Thursday in March, 1999, Howie Patino stepped onto Alaska Airlines Flight 190 out of Anchorage, carrying a teddy bear with a little ribbon across the front that read, Alaska’s Cool! Howie wore his best suit, his only suit, because he wanted to look like he was “dressed for success.” He also wore, he told me later, a huge smile. “A big, fat, dumb one,” he said. “How dumb, stupid, and blind can a guy be?”
His sleep was peaceful on the trip to Los Angeles. Hardly a hint of turbulence. The guy sitting next to him was no trouble at all, chatting amiably without overdoing it. Mostly Howie slept and dreamed of Rae—Rae in a bathing suit. Rae sitting by the pool and offering him a long, cool drink. Rae making kissing noises at him just like she used to.
Howie woke up smiling when the plane touched down at the Los Angeles Airport as smooth as a swan gliding onto a pond at Disneyland. That was one of Howie’s favorite places. He and Rae had gone there on their honeymoon. He told me that Rae’s favorite attraction was “Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride.” They went on it five times that night, laughing and screaming like little kids.
The sleep on the plane had removed any creeping hint of fatigue, so Howie wasn’t tired when he finally made it to the Greyhound station and boarded the bus. It had all gone so well to this point. Howie closed his eyes and thanked God that he and Rae would be together even sooner than planned.
The trip north, though, took forever.
It was bumper-to-bumper into Westwood and through the Sepulveda Pass. Things opened up a little in Sherman Oaks but tightened again around Tarzana. All the way up, Howie ticked off the towns in his head in a cadence of anticipation: Calabasas and Agoura, Westlake and Thousand Oaks, Ventura and Ojai. Like stepping stones across dividing waters, they were taking him closer and closer to Rae.
It was pure night when the bus finally pulled into Hinton. Moonless. And the town, in its peculiar rustic ceremony, was starting to fold up. Through the bus window Howie saw a few tourists sitting on the outside patio of the Hinton Hotel sipping evening wine and watching the passengers—all three of them—step out into a bit of country California.
The first to alight was Howie, still holding the teddy bear. An older couple sitting at the hotel smiled at him. A good sign. Howie smiled back, snatched his duffel bag from the sidewalk where the bus driver had dropped it, looped it over his shoulder, and started walking west toward White Oak Avenue.
Hinton was both strange and familiar, Howie told me. It seemed, as he got further and further from the town square, unnaturally still. Mixed with the hopeful perfume of orange blossoms and sage, the smell of cows and dry weeds wafted through the air. Howie said later that those were the last smells he remembered, until that final smell, the awful stench of fresh blood that he would mention in the police report.
At White Oak he turned south under an awning of towering eucalyptus trees. It was like walking through a dark tunnel, Howie said, but he knew where the light at the end was—home and Rae, security and warmth. All would be well once again.
When he finally reached the front door of the little house at the end of White Oak, he was dizzy with excitement. He tossed the duffel bag onto the porch and held the teddy bear behind his back as he reached for the doorknob. The door was locked, though, and Rae hadn’t given him a house key when he left for Alaska. This was one of her peculiarities, which Howie overlooked through eyes of love. He wouldn’t be sneaking in for the surprise he’d planned, so he knocked.
And waited.
And knocked again.
He shouted, “Rae!” and pounded on the door.
No answer. No lights on inside.
He set the little bear on top of the duffel bag and went around to the side gate, finding it padlocked. It had never been padlocked before. Something wasn’t right.
“Rae!”
A dog barked in the yard next door.
“Quiet!” Howie ordered as he scaled the wall and jumped into the side yard, knocking over a recycling container. It thudded hard on the walkway, its contents of bottles and cans spilling onto the concrete.
The dog barked louder.
“Quiet, boy!”
Howie slipped around to the back patio. The sliding glass door was never locked. Never a need for it in Hinton. He would get in that way.
But tonight it was locked. Howie banged on the glass with his fist. No answer from inside.
Okay, so she wasn’t home.
Where was she then? Out with friends maybe. She wasn’t expecting him, after all. He’d caught an early flight because he wanted to surprise her. All this was his own fault, Rae would tell him, maybe at the top of her lungs. That was her way sometimes. He’d grown used to it.
Howie considered his choices. He could grab his stuff and go downtown and have a Coke while he waited. He could see if she was at Sue’s house, and if not, he could ask Sue to make some calls.
Or he could try to get in the house.
With full force, Howie yanked the sliding glass door. The lock snapped, and the door slid open. Later, Howie would say he didn’t realize he had that much strength and speculated that his action might have been due to something more welled up inside him, a part of him he never knew he had, like when a mother suddenly gets the strength to lift an automobile when her child is trapped underneath.
Howie entered the house, found a lamp, and turned on the light.
The first thing he noticed was the sofa and the clothes tossed carelessly on it. Rae was never much of a housekeeper, but this was an out-and-out mess. On an end table was an ashtray with a few cigarette butts. Rae had supposedly quit smoking. Had she started up again while he was away?
Howie stood and listened for a few moments, and not hearing anything, walked down the hall to the master bedroom.
He opened the door and turned on the light.
Someone was in bed. The covers moved and then Rae Patino sat up.
“Rae, didn’t you hear me?”
Her red hair was messy. With a head toss she whisked the strands out of her face and stared at him coldly. “What are you doing here?”
“I’m home.”
“Tomorrow. You said tomorrow night.”
“Surprised?” He took a few steps toward her, his arms out for an embrace.
Rae recoiled. “You can’t stay here.”
“Honey, what are you talking about?”
“You just can’t, that’s all.”
“Can’t? But—”
“Just leave, Howie.”
“But Rae, I’m home.” He said it like he had to convince himself.
Rae sighed and rolled her eyes to the ceiling. “Look,” she said, “you might as well know it now. I’m in love with somebody else.”
It wouldn’t have been any different, Howie said later, if she had stuck a knife in his stomach and carved him like a Halloween pumpkin. That was the moment things started to go fuzzy on him. He was in and out after that, feeling dizzy half the time and plain lost the other half.
He figured a half hour went by as he pleaded with her, cried in front of her, begged her to see someone for counseling. It seemed to him she was, by turns, cold and caring, obstinate and open. He thought there might be at least some hope of reconciliation, if only she’d try.
And then there was the matter of Brian. During the course of the conversation, Howie asked Rae where their five-year-old son was, and she told him he was at Sue’s house, where he loved to visit. It seemed odd to Howie that Brian would be there in the middle of the week, but he paid it no mind. It was more important to talk about their future, the three of them, together.
Howie finally said, “We can all move up there now. I’ve got a place and a good job. They’re building like crazy, and it’s a great place for a kid to grow up.”
Rae was unmoved. “I’m not going to freeze in Alaska, you can bet on that.”
“Rae, please. We need to be together. For Brian.”
When he said that, her eyes seemed to darken. Howie remembered that explicitly. It was like looking into two dead pools at midnight.
“What makes you so proud?” Rae said.
“Proud?”
“Yeah, proud.”
“Proud of what?”
“Brian.” Her voice seemed to spit the name.
“What are you talking about, Rae?”
“I’m talking about Brian, Howie.”
“What about him?”
“What makes you think he’s yours?”
It was the smile on her face then that unlatched a dark door to some unnamed oblivion. Howie’s memories of the next few minutes were short, surreal images, which included that smile twisting her face into a funhouse clown expression, the mockery of it, and her hands clasped behind her head as she lay on the bed as if showing Howie what he would never have again. Then came the blackness followed by the gleam of a blade, a flash almost as bright as a tabloid photographer’s camera, a scream, the red stained sheets, the sounds of a woman sucking for breath, and that final image he couldn’t get away from, that he kept mentioning over and over. “The devil,” the police report stated. “Suspect keeps talking about the devil.”

 

Blind Justice is available for purchase at:

 Amazon Kindle for $0.99

 

Connect with James Scott Bell:

Website: www.jamesscottbell.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/James-Scott-Bell/108765742543789

Twitter: witter.com/jamesscottbell

Terminal Ambition: A Maggie Mahoney Novel, Kate McGuinness {$4.99 or Borrow FREE w/Prime!}

Woody Allen once said, “There are three sexes: men, women and lawyers.” Woody never worked in a big law firm. Sexual secrets threaten to blow up Sweeny, Owens & Boyle, the Wall Street law firm at the center of Terminal Ambition, A Maggie Mahoney Novel. Sexual harassment is routine there, but disclosure of the firm chairman’s kink could disqualify him as the next U. S. Attorney General. He’s lined up for confirmation hearings when female partner Maggie Mahoney uncovers the bargain he made to hide his secret. Panicked, he ups the ante to try to buy her silence. If ambition rules, can justice prevail?

What readers are saying:

“Kate McGuinness knows all too well the corporate world of go-along-to-get-ahead that so many women face today. In Terminal Ambition, she’s crafted a firm as believable… and as slimy… as any created by Turow or Grisham. Read it!” Melanie Rigney, former editor at Writer’s Digest magazine

“A fast, lean read that charges to a big bang finish.”

“Got me from page 1!”

“Terminal Ambition hits all the marks for a legal thriller: masked motivations, hidden histories, personal perils and high stakes. ”

“A woman’s fight for justice in the workplace.”

“Satisfying and engrossing.”

The average Amazon reader review rating is currently 4.6 stars, with 47 reviews.

Click here to read more about and purchase Terminal Ambition: A Maggie Mahoney Novel Mystery for $4.99 or Borrow FREE w/Prime at Amazon

Amarillo, Bill Durham {$0.99}

In the Texas Panhandle town of Amarillo, New York attorney Max Friedman is assigned to represent a nightmare client. Joe Wagner is a violent man, dangerous both to family and friends. As Max builds his defense case for murder, he reveals a reason for Joe’s violence. But is it a justification? The characters whom Max meets during the course of his investigation include Smith Dixon, a career criminal trying to change the course of his life; Carl Puente, a gambler desperate for a big score; Carl’s brother-in-law Freddie Odom, a family man drowning in alcoholism; legendary police detective Champ Phillips; Angel, a pool hall owner who both frightens and attracts Max; and Bailey, a wolf-dog hybrid who is the bouncer at the pool hall.

What readers are saying:

“There is a slow-burning, burgeoning romance, a taut, pacy courtroom drama and a psychological thriller almost Gothic in its intensity.”

“Durham makes his characters so human – I really cared about them.”

“A fine read, highly recommended. Courtroom scenes as good as any I’ve read by anyone else.”

“. . . engages his reader almost from the first page and you are anxious to see where he is going to take you.”

“The story that unfolds is amazing – and unlike any other thriller that I’ve ever read. I recommend this book highly.”

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 5 stars {16 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Amarillo for $0.99  from Amazon

Amarillo, Bill Durham {$0.99}

In the Texas Panhandle town of Amarillo, New York attorney Max Friedman is assigned to represent a nightmare client. Joe Wagner is a violent man, dangerous both to family and friends. As Max builds his defense case for murder, he reveals a reason for Joe’s violence. But is it a justification? The characters whom Max meets during the course of his investigation include Smith Dixon, a career criminal trying to change the course of his life; Carl Puente, a gambler desperate for a big score; Carl’s brother-in-law Freddie Odom, a family man drowning in alcoholism; legendary police detective Champ Phillips; Angel, a pool hall owner who both frightens and attracts Max; and Bailey, a wolf-dog hybrid who is the bouncer at the pool hall.

What readers are saying:

“There is a slow-burning, burgeoning romance, a taut, pacy courtroom drama and a psychological thriller almost Gothic in its intensity.”

“Durham makes his characters so human – I really cared about them.”

“A fine read, highly recommended. Courtroom scenes as good as any I’ve read by anyone else.”

“. . . engages his reader almost from the first page and you are anxious to see where he is going to take you.”

“The story that unfolds is amazing – and unlike any other thriller that I’ve ever read. I recommend this book highly.”

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 5 stars {16 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Amarillo for $0.99  from Amazon


KINDLE DAILY DEAL: Identity: Lost from Pascal Marco is Just $0.99 Today Only!

It’s July, 1975 and an overworked Chicago police force receives a call that an 85-year-old white man has been attacked by a gang of black youths on the lakefront in Burnham Park. Amid public outrage, contentious Mayor Richard J. Daley commands his police to find the killers fast and make the bucolic park safe again.Uncommonly but fortunately for the police, twelve-year-old James Overstreet steps forward and identifies five of the six assailants and arrests are made. But detectives and county attorneys bungle the case, leaving the judge no choice but to release the accused.This startling turn of events jeopardizes James’s life, forcing the entire Overstreet family into witness protection in Arizona, and creates a nightmare that will haunt the brave witness forever.Fast-forward thirty years. The stoic young man has grown to become Maricopa County’s most feared prosecutor. But his life is about to be turned upside down when paths from the past cross into the present, veering toward a shocking climax.

What readers are saying:

The plot of the story, as well as the interesting and challenging characters kept me intrigued.

I look forward to Pascal’s next book!

A very interesting plot with some twists and turns along the way.

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 4.5 stars {72 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Identity: Lost for $0.99* from Amazon

*Price goes back up to $9.99 tomorrow!

 

THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Vaccine Nation, David Lender {$2.99 or Borrow FREE with Prime!}

Sponsored Post

David Lender’s Frugal Find Under Nine:

 

Description of Vaccine Nation:

Dani North is a filmmaker who just won at the Tribeca Film Festival for her documentary, The Drugging of Our Children, a film critical of the pharmaceutical industry. When she is handed “whistleblower” evidence about the U.S. vaccination program, she has to keep herself alive long enough to expose it before a megalomaniacal pharmaceutical company CEO can have her killed.

 

Accolade:

A Masterpiece – 5 out of 5 Stars

Vaccine Nation by David Lender is quite possibly the best book I’ve read this year. It is definitely among the titles that comprise my list of all-time great books I have read.

In Vaccine Nation Dani North is documentary filmmaker and an advocate for parents who want the choice of whether their children should be vaccinated and who want more information made available about the safety of those vaccines. Dani has just landed on top of the story of the year, only she doesn’t know it, what she does know is moments after handing off a mysterious flash drive to her the scientist who placed it in her hands is killed right in front of her. Before she even has time to consider what might be on the flash drive an attempt is made on her life and she’s on the run from a killer who will stop at nothing to retrieve the data Dani now possesses.

Lender is a master storyteller weaving together fact and fiction to create a totally plausible story. My heart was racing within reading the first pages of this wonderful work of fiction and it didn’t slow down until the very end. I was enthralled by the story and found myself wondering time and again where fact ended and fiction started, because, scarily, the scenario Lender paints in Vaccine Nation absolutely could happen.

Lender is an exceptional talent whose stories rank him alongside the very best names in thrillers – names like Thomas Harris, Robert Ludlum, Dennis Lehane, John le Carre and Lee Child. He writes broadly across the thriller category and he never fails to deliver a spine-tingling story that is so scary because it is so believable, so well-researched and extremely well-written.

If you only have time to read one story this year I would make certain it is Vaccine Nation. It is a magnificent piece of literary fiction that will leave you fearing the big name pharmaceutical companies and the power they wield over each and every one of our lives. I offer it my highest recommendation and I have nothing but praise for Vaccine Nation and David Lender.

 

 

Amazon Reader Reviews:

Vaccine Nation currently has a reader review rating of 4.5 stars from 27 reviews. Read the reviews here.

 

An excerpt from Vaccine Nation:

Chapter 1

Dani North walked down West End Avenue toward the Mercer School, her son Gabe at her side.  The air was cold and fresh.  Minutes earlier, crossing Broadway, she’d seen tulips on the median, and the leaves on the maple trees were ready to pop.  Now, scents of spring—wet earth and hyacinths in window boxes—were apparent.  She yawned, bone tired from the hectic weeks of the Tribeca Film Festival wearing her down on top of work and the daily routine of single-parenting a preteen.  Tired or not, she was on a high and Gabe walked close enough that she thought to take his hand.  That is, if he’d let me. She reminded herself it was perfectly normal for a nine-year-old not to want his mom to hold his hand anymore.  Normal. What would those morons at Division of Youth and Family Services in New Jersey say about that?  Probably still call him ADHD and drug him up.  She’d love to run DYFS into the ground, along with their partners in crime, the pharmaceutical industry.  Legalized drug pushers.

Leave it, she told herself.  Channel the anger into something productive.  That made her smile.  She had, and well.  It was starting to feel real that The Drugging of Our Children, her latest film, had won best documentary at Tribeca last night.  That channeled anger was doing some good, getting the word out.  Educating parents about their choices, ones she hadn’t been aware of for Gabe.  Who knew?  If she had, she might never have lost that three-year nightmare of lawsuits with DYFS in Hackensack.  It forced her to accept mandatory drugging of Gabe, because otherwise the court would have taken him from her.

She looked over at Gabe now.  Chin high, proud of how he looked in his Ralph Lauren blue blazer, gray pants and white oxford button-down, school tie snugged up against his neck.  Only his black Vans betrayed his age.  Yes, normal.Thanks in part to Dr. O.

Gabe caught her looking at him.  “Now that you won, you gonna get a bonus and turn the electric back on?”

“You mean ‘going to’ and ‘electricity.’”  She thought about the last two weeks of burning candles at night.  She’d put off the electric bill in order to scrape up Gabe’s tuition for this semester at Mercer.  “Besides, we were camping, remember?”

“C’mon, Mom, that worked on me when I was like five years old.  I’m not a kid anymore.”

“Yes, you are.”

Gabe thought for a second.  “All right, but I’m not stupid.”

“No, I’m not getting a bonus,” Dani said, running a hand over Gabe’s hair, “but I get paid today and we’ll be back to normal.  Lights and TV.”

“Next time I’m telling Nanny.  She’ll pay it.”

“Do that and you can forget about TV until you’re eighteen.”

They reached the corner diagonally across West End from the entrance to Mercer.  “Leave me here,” Gabe said, looking away from her.

Dani didn’t respond, just grabbed his shirtsleeve between her fingers and started across the street.  He pulled out of her grasp and increased his pace.  Dani saw Damien Richardson on the opposite corner as they approached.  He stood looking at the half dozen kids grouped around the entrance to Mercer, tentative.  She knew the bigger boys picked on Damien.  She felt a tug at her heart.  “Morning, Damien,” she called.

Damien turned to them.  His face brightened and he smiled.  “Hi, Mrs. North.  What’s up Gabe?”

“Come on, Damien,” Dani whispered when she reached him.  “I’ll walk you in.”

Ten minutes later she crossed 79th Street toward Broadway, her mind buzzing with last night’s triumph and her upcoming day.  She pulled her BlackBerry out of her pocket, checked the screen.  8:10. Enough time to get through her voicemails and emails before Dr. Maguire, the researcher from Pharma International, showed up.  Now she wondered again what his agenda was, why he was so anxious and secretive about the meeting.  But it was something important—at least to Maguire.  She’d been calling him for weeks, coaxing him into an interview for the new documentary on autism she was just beginning.  She’d been referred to Maguire by his friend, John McCloskey, the KellerDorne Pharmaceutical technician who’d served as whistleblower on KellerDorne’s painkiller, Myriad, after patients who took it started dropping dead from heart attacks.  Dani’s interview of McCloskey published in the Crusador was well after McCloskey went public, but somehow it managed to electrify the issue.  As a result, the contributions had flowed into Dr. Orlovski to fund the documentaries he produced, including Dani’s The Drugging of Our Children.

Maybe Maguire needed to get something off his chest, too.  Dani picked up her pace.  Her BlackBerry rang and her breath caught in her throat when she saw Mom’s number on the screen.  How could she forget?  Dad.

“Hi, Mom.  How are you doing?”

“Okay.”  She paused.  “You know what day it is, don’t you?”

Dani’s mind automatically did the math.  She’d been twenty-two.  Seven years.  “Of course.”  She stopped walking and leaned over the BlackBerry as if sheltering her words from passersby.  She said, “Each year I think about him constantly during this day.  Sometimes it seems like . . .” her voice trailed off.

“I miss him more each year, too,” Mom said.  Her voice was steady, like she’d steeled herself to get through the day.

“When’s his Mass?”

“One o’clock.”

Dani didn’t respond right away.  “I can’t make it this year.”

“I know, sweetie.  I just wanted to hear your voice.  I knew you weren’t coming.  You had a big day yesterday.  Congratulations.  I’m sure lots of people want to talk to you.”

“It’s not that.  I’m just jammed with the usual stuff.  Will you light a candle for me?”

“Sure.  I’ll speak to you later.  Gabe okay?”

“He’s great.  Maybe we’ll get out this weekend.  How’s Jack?”

“The same.”  Dani felt her hand muscles tense around the BlackBerry.

“Anything going on?”

“The usual.  He was out most of the night, couldn’t get up for work.”

“I’ll get out there this weekend,” Dani said.  They signed off.  She continued walking, feeling guilty.  Lisa and George lived far enough away that they never made Dad’s Mass.  And Jack was high half the time, so it was like she was alone even if he came with her.  At least Mom could count on Dani.  Or so she thought.  This was the second year in a row Dani would miss Dad’s Mass.  It hurt.  Particularly knowing how devout a Catholic Mom was, how much Mom wanted Dani to experience her faith the way she did.  She sighed and kept walking, thinking she’d find a way to make it up to Mom, feeling unworthy.

Dani reached the entrance to Dr. Yuri Orlovski’s office at 79th and Broadway.  A half dozen patients already sat in the waiting room when she stepped through the door.  She paused to wave at Carla behind the reception desk, who mouthed “Congratulations.”  Dani nodded and smiled, then headed up the steep, 20 steps to her office.  By the time she reached the top, she reflected as she usually did, What would I do without Dr. O? It was the best job she’d ever had, even aside from him rescuing Gabe a year ago from Child Protective Services, New York’s equivalent of New Jersey’s DYFS.  Dr. O’s homeopathic remedies and detoxification had purged Gabe’s body of the mercury and other poisons that Dr. O maintained were largely caused by vaccines.  And he certified as an MD that Gabe’s ADHD was “cured.”  That got Gabe off Child Protective Services’ list and off mandatory ADHD medications to attend public school.  This year she’d scrounged up enough to afford to get him into Mercer.

And now she ran the nonmedical practice side of Dr. O’s mini-empire, as he jokingly called it.  But it was no joke.  It was a flourishing Internet business of whole food based vitamins; health-related DVDs and books; and healthy lifestyle products like juicers and water filters.  And a good portion of the profits funded Dr. O’s real passion: the documentaries on health issues that Dani produced and directed, the only thing—except, of course for Gabe—that got her out of bed every morning.

Her colleagues, Richard Kaminsky, Jason Waite and Seth Weinstein stood talking near the entrance to Dr. O’s Vitamin Shop when Dani got to the top of the steps.  Richard started applauding and the others joined in.  She stood, cringing from embarrassment, yet secretly relishing the recognition.  They walked over and greeted her with hugs.

“I knew you’d do it,” Richard said.

“Absolutely,” Ralph said.

They were joined by a half dozen others, including Kaitlin Drake, her editor.  Dani was gradually overcome by an odd sensation of discomfort.  She recalled how she’d wilted under the spotlight when asked to say a few words on accepting her award last night.  It made her feel as if her colleagues would think she was undeserving of their praise if they’d seen her frozen with panic.  She’d wanted to say something about creating a film that spoke her truth, and that of thousands of other mothers, but she was unable to utter more than “Thank you,” in front of 2,000 people.

It took Dani another ten minutes to reach her desk.  She booted up her computer and started going through her emails.  Eighty-four today.  Oof. The usual: mothers with no money and sick children, desperate to see Dr. O.  Many she was counseling on vitamins and remedies.  A few like Jennifer Knox: a mother with an autistic child who Dani had interviewed for her new documentary, who needed to vent to someone who understood, keep her from going crazy.  Finally, a number of congratulatory wishes.  Then her voicemails.  Thirty-six, more of the same. One was from James, at first congratulating her, next a little pathetic and finally lecturing her about not throwing away five years.  As she neared the end of her voicemails she heard his voice again, and feeling nothing at all—rather than angry or impatient—deleted the message without listening to it.  That one probably hammered at James’ constant theme: commitment.  After she finished with her voicemails she checked her blog: 3,748 pageviews yesterday, about 50% more than usual. She wrote a quick blog post thanking her supporters and urging them to continue to spread the word on Drugging and it’s message, looked at the time—8:58—then sat back in her chair to wait for Dr. Maguire.


Vaccine Nation is available for purchase at:

Amazon Kindle for $2.99 or borrow for FREE with Prime!

Paperback for $7.98


Connect with David Lender:

Website: http://www.davidlender.net/

Blog: http://davidlender.blogspot.com/

Amazon Author Central page: http://amzn.to/uLQqKp

Twitter account: http://twitter.com/#!/davidtlender

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=10000140123841

Vaccine Nation, David Lender {$2.99 or borrow for FREE with Amazon Prime!}

Dani North is a filmmaker who just won at the Tribeca Film Festival for her documentary, The Drugging of Our Children, a film critical of the pharmaceutical industry. When she is handed “whistleblower” evidence about the U.S. vaccination program, she has to keep herself alive long enough to expose it before a megalomaniacal pharmaceutical company CEO can have her killed.

Excerpts from Trojan Horse, The Gravy Train and Bull Street, David Lender’s other thrillers, follow the text of Vaccine Nation.

What readers are saying:

“. . . credible characters, non-stop action, and a satisfying resolution.”

“. . . an action thriller, with the added plus of Lender’s flair for dialog, character development and even some romance.”

The average Amazon reader review is currently 4.5 stars {26 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Vaccine Nation for $2.99 or borrow it for FREE with Amazon Prime!

THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Vaccine Nation, David Lender {$2.99}

Sponsored Post

David Lender’s Frugal Find Under Nine:

 

Description of Vaccine Nation:

Dani North is a filmmaker who just won at the Tribeca Film Festival for her documentary, The Drugging of Our Children, a film critical of the pharmaceutical industry. When she is handed “whistleblower” evidence about the U.S. vaccination program, she has to keep herself alive long enough to expose it before a megalomaniacal pharmaceutical company CEO can have her killed.

 

Accolade:

Thrill Ride – 5 out of 5 Stars

This is my first of this author’s books, and it won’t be my last. Not only is it a great thriller, but it has well rounded characters and it makes you think about some issues that concern us all. The heroine, Dani, hates the drug companies and by the end of the book, gives you reason to at least question them too.

But enough about that for now. First and foremost, this is a great thriller. It starts off with a jarring bang, with a murder, and moves quickly from there. The pace keeps you on the edge of your seat and the suspense starts to build as well. Dani is on the run from the police and a murderer, which keeps you breathless in spurts. When the author lets you get a breather, he starts building the suspense. What’s Dani been handed by the man who was killed? A garden-variety memory drive, but what’s on it? She figures out that the murderer, or whoever he’s working for, knows what it is and wants it back. That means she needs to figure out what’s on it. In stages, she starts to. You get all prickly in the hairs on the back of your neck, wondering what it is as well, then see the murderer, and his boss, a drug company CEO, closing in. She starts to figure it out, but will she do it in time?

The plot includes some twists that you can’t possibly be prepared for, great action, searing suspense, and stop-you-in-your-tracks surprises at the end.

 

But, as I said earlier, it also makes you think. Why are we drugging up our kids with anti-depressants and ADHD pills that Big Pharma is foisting on us without questioning it? How come our babies are getting shot up with so many vaccines? What kind of junk is in them? Why isn’t our government letting the drug companies be held responsible for any side effects and damage they create (hard to believe, but true)? Do the drug companies really care about our health, or are they just out to sell us high-profit-margin products like any other profit-oriented business?


Amazon Reader Reviews:

Vaccine Nation currently has a reader review rating of 5 stars from 5 reviews. Read the reviews here.

 

An excerpt from Vaccine Nation:

Chapter 1

Dani North walked down West End Avenue toward the Mercer School, her son Gabe at her side.  The air was cold and fresh.  Minutes earlier, crossing Broadway, she’d seen tulips on the median, and the leaves on the maple trees were ready to pop.  Now, scents of spring—wet earth and hyacinths in window boxes—were apparent.  She yawned, bone tired from the hectic weeks of the Tribeca Film Festival wearing her down on top of work and the daily routine of single-parenting a preteen.  Tired or not, she was on a high and Gabe walked close enough that she thought to take his hand.  That is, if he’d let me. She reminded herself it was perfectly normal for a nine-year-old not to want his mom to hold his hand anymore.  Normal. What would those morons at Division of Youth and Family Services in New Jersey say about that?  Probably still call him ADHD and drug him up.  She’d love to run DYFS into the ground, along with their partners in crime, the pharmaceutical industry.  Legalized drug pushers.

Leave it, she told herself.  Channel the anger into something productive.  That made her smile.  She had, and well.  It was starting to feel real that The Drugging of Our Children, her latest film, had won best documentary at Tribeca last night.  That channeled anger was doing some good, getting the word out.  Educating parents about their choices, ones she hadn’t been aware of for Gabe.  Who knew?  If she had, she might never have lost that three-year nightmare of lawsuits with DYFS in Hackensack.  It forced her to accept mandatory drugging of Gabe, because otherwise the court would have taken him from her.

She looked over at Gabe now.  Chin high, proud of how he looked in his Ralph Lauren blue blazer, gray pants and white oxford button-down, school tie snugged up against his neck.  Only his black Vans betrayed his age.  Yes, normal. Thanks in part to Dr. O.

Gabe caught her looking at him.  “Now that you won, you gonna get a bonus and turn the electric back on?”

“You mean ‘going to’ and ‘electricity.’”  She thought about the last two weeks of burning candles at night.  She’d put off the electric bill in order to scrape up Gabe’s tuition for this semester at Mercer.  “Besides, we were camping, remember?”

“C’mon, Mom, that worked on me when I was like five years old.  I’m not a kid anymore.”

“Yes, you are.”

Gabe thought for a second.  “All right, but I’m not stupid.”

“No, I’m not getting a bonus,” Dani said, running a hand over Gabe’s hair, “but I get paid today and we’ll be back to normal.  Lights and TV.”

“Next time I’m telling Nanny.  She’ll pay it.”

“Do that and you can forget about TV until you’re eighteen.”

They reached the corner diagonally across West End from the entrance to Mercer.  “Leave me here,” Gabe said, looking away from her.

Dani didn’t respond, just grabbed his shirtsleeve between her fingers and started across the street.  He pulled out of her grasp and increased his pace.  Dani saw Damien Richardson on the opposite corner as they approached.  He stood looking at the half dozen kids grouped around the entrance to Mercer, tentative.  She knew the bigger boys picked on Damien.  She felt a tug at her heart.  “Morning, Damien,” she called.

Damien turned to them.  His face brightened and he smiled.  “Hi, Mrs. North.  What’s up Gabe?”

“Come on, Damien,” Dani whispered when she reached him.  “I’ll walk you in.”

Ten minutes later she crossed 79th Street toward Broadway, her mind buzzing with last night’s triumph and her upcoming day.  She pulled her BlackBerry out of her pocket, checked the screen.  8:10. Enough time to get through her voicemails and emails before Dr. Maguire, the researcher from Pharma International, showed up.  Now she wondered again what his agenda was, why he was so anxious and secretive about the meeting.  But it was something important—at least to Maguire.  She’d been calling him for weeks, coaxing him into an interview for the new documentary on autism she was just beginning.  She’d been referred to Maguire by his friend, John McCloskey, the KellerDorne Pharmaceutical technician who’d served as whistleblower on KellerDorne’s painkiller, Myriad, after patients who took it started dropping dead from heart attacks.  Dani’s interview of McCloskey published in the Crusador was well after McCloskey went public, but somehow it managed to electrify the issue.  As a result, the contributions had flowed into Dr. Orlovski to fund the documentaries he produced, including Dani’s The Drugging of Our Children.

Maybe Maguire needed to get something off his chest, too.  Dani picked up her pace.  Her BlackBerry rang and her breath caught in her throat when she saw Mom’s number on the screen.  How could she forget?  Dad.

“Hi, Mom.  How are you doing?”

“Okay.”  She paused.  “You know what day it is, don’t you?”

Dani’s mind automatically did the math.  She’d been twenty-two.  Seven years.  “Of course.”  She stopped walking and leaned over the BlackBerry as if sheltering her words from passersby.  She said, “Each year I think about him constantly during this day.  Sometimes it seems like . . .” her voice trailed off.

“I miss him more each year, too,” Mom said.  Her voice was steady, like she’d steeled herself to get through the day.

“When’s his Mass?”

“One o’clock.”

Dani didn’t respond right away.  “I can’t make it this year.”

“I know, sweetie.  I just wanted to hear your voice.  I knew you weren’t coming.  You had a big day yesterday.  Congratulations.  I’m sure lots of people want to talk to you.”

“It’s not that.  I’m just jammed with the usual stuff.  Will you light a candle for me?”

“Sure.  I’ll speak to you later.  Gabe okay?”

“He’s great.  Maybe we’ll get out this weekend.  How’s Jack?”

“The same.”  Dani felt her hand muscles tense around the BlackBerry.

“Anything going on?”

“The usual.  He was out most of the night, couldn’t get up for work.”

“I’ll get out there this weekend,” Dani said.  They signed off.  She continued walking, feeling guilty.  Lisa and George lived far enough away that they never made Dad’s Mass.  And Jack was high half the time, so it was like she was alone even if he came with her.  At least Mom could count on Dani.  Or so she thought.  This was the second year in a row Dani would miss Dad’s Mass.  It hurt.  Particularly knowing how devout a Catholic Mom was, how much Mom wanted Dani to experience her faith the way she did.  She sighed and kept walking, thinking she’d find a way to make it up to Mom, feeling unworthy.

Dani reached the entrance to Dr. Yuri Orlovski’s office at 79th and Broadway.  A half dozen patients already sat in the waiting room when she stepped through the door.  She paused to wave at Carla behind the reception desk, who mouthed “Congratulations.”  Dani nodded and smiled, then headed up the steep, 20 steps to her office.  By the time she reached the top, she reflected as she usually did, What would I do without Dr. O? It was the best job she’d ever had, even aside from him rescuing Gabe a year ago from Child Protective Services, New York’s equivalent of New Jersey’s DYFS.  Dr. O’s homeopathic remedies and detoxification had purged Gabe’s body of the mercury and other poisons that Dr. O maintained were largely caused by vaccines.  And he certified as an MD that Gabe’s ADHD was “cured.”  That got Gabe off Child Protective Services’ list and off mandatory ADHD medications to attend public school.  This year she’d scrounged up enough to afford to get him into Mercer.

And now she ran the nonmedical practice side of Dr. O’s mini-empire, as he jokingly called it.  But it was no joke.  It was a flourishing Internet business of whole food based vitamins; health-related DVDs and books; and healthy lifestyle products like juicers and water filters.  And a good portion of the profits funded Dr. O’s real passion: the documentaries on health issues that Dani produced and directed, the only thing—except, of course for Gabe—that got her out of bed every morning.

Her colleagues, Richard Kaminsky, Jason Waite and Seth Weinstein stood talking near the entrance to Dr. O’s Vitamin Shop when Dani got to the top of the steps.  Richard started applauding and the others joined in.  She stood, cringing from embarrassment, yet secretly relishing the recognition.  They walked over and greeted her with hugs.

“I knew you’d do it,” Richard said.

“Absolutely,” Ralph said.

They were joined by a half dozen others, including Kaitlin Drake, her editor.  Dani was gradually overcome by an odd sensation of discomfort.  She recalled how she’d wilted under the spotlight when asked to say a few words on accepting her award last night.  It made her feel as if her colleagues would think she was undeserving of their praise if they’d seen her frozen with panic.  She’d wanted to say something about creating a film that spoke her truth, and that of thousands of other mothers, but she was unable to utter more than “Thank you,” in front of 2,000 people.

It took Dani another ten minutes to reach her desk.  She booted up her computer and started going through her emails.  Eighty-four today.  Oof. The usual: mothers with no money and sick children, desperate to see Dr. O.  Many she was counseling on vitamins and remedies.  A few like Jennifer Knox: a mother with an autistic child who Dani had interviewed for her new documentary, who needed to vent to someone who understood, keep her from going crazy.  Finally, a number of congratulatory wishes.  Then her voicemails.  Thirty-six, more of the same. One was from James, at first congratulating her, next a little pathetic and finally lecturing her about not throwing away five years.  As she neared the end of her voicemails she heard his voice again, and feeling nothing at all—rather than angry or impatient—deleted the message without listening to it.  That one probably hammered at James’ constant theme: commitment.  After she finished with her voicemails she checked her blog: 3,748 pageviews yesterday, about 50% more than usual. She wrote a quick blog post thanking her supporters and urging them to continue to spread the word on Drugging and it’s message, looked at the time—8:58—then sat back in her chair to wait for Dr. Maguire.


Vaccine Nation is available for purchase at:

Amazon Kindle for $2.99

Paperback for $7.98


Connect with David Lender:

Website: http://www.davidlender.net/

Blog: http://davidlender.blogspot.com/

Amazon Author Central page: http://amzn.to/uLQqKp

Twitter account: http://twitter.com/#!/davidtlender

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=10000140123841

Top Five Under Five Friday! {Legal Thrillers}

Happy Friday! Check out the Top Five Under Five bestselling Legal Thriller eBooks from the Kindle Store!

 

 

#1 ~ SILENT WITNESS (legal thriller, thriller) (The Witness Series,#2), Rebecca Forster ~ $0.99 {4.5 Stars, 30 Reviews}

#2PRIVILEGED WITNESS (legal thriller, thriller) (The Witness Series, #3), Rebecca Forster ~ $2.99 {4 Stars, 14 Reviews}

#3 Motion To Kill (Lou Mason Thrillers), Joel Goldman ~ $0.99 {4.5 Stars, 25 Reviews}

#4 The Mummy Case (Jim Knighthorse Series #2), J.R. Rain ~ $3.99 {4.5 Stars, 24 Reviews}

#5TO SPEAK FOR THE DEAD (The Jake Lassiter Series), Paul Levine ~ $2.99 {4 Stars, 14 Reviews}

Click on the above covers or links to read more about and purchase the Top Five Under Five Bestselling eBooks at Amazon!

THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Irreparable Harm (A Legal Thriller), Melissa F. Miller {$2.99}

Sponsored Post

Melissa F. Miller‘s Frugal Find Under Nine:

Irreparable Harm (A Legal Thriller)

 

Description:

There’s a smartphone app that can crash a plane. And it’s for sale to the highest bidder . . .

Attorney Sasha McCandless is closing in on the prize after eight long years: she’s months away from being made partner at a prestigious law firm. All she has to do is keep her head down and her billable hours up.

Then a plane operated by her client slams into the side of a mountain, killing everyone aboard. Sasha gears up to prepare a defense to the inevitable civil lawsuits.

She soon realizes the crash was no accident: a developer has created an application that can control a commercial plane’s onboard computer from a smartphone.

Sasha joins forces with a federal air marshal who’s investigating the crash. As they race to prevent another disaster, people close to the matter start to die. And she’s next on the list.

Sasha will need to rely on her legal training and her Krav Maga training in equal measure to find and stop a madman before he strikes again.

Irreparable Harm is a taut introduction to an unforgettable protagonist.

Approximate word count: 80,000 words, 414 pages (print version)

 

Accolade:

“Irreparable Harm by Melissa F. Miller is a fast paced riveting page-turner! I couldn’t put it down and it consumed my entire weekend until I finished the very last page! The storyline is believable and full of suspense! I fell in love with the characters and am hoping she brings them back in another story. Melissa F. Miller has incredible talent as a writer and her knowledge of the legal system is very thorough. I am really looking forward to her next book.”


Reviews:

Irreparable Harm (A Legal Thriller) currently has a customer review rating of 5 stars. Read the reviews here.


An excerpt from Irreparable Harm (A Legal Thriller):

CHAPTER 1

Somewhere in the air over Blacksburg, Virginia

The old man checked his new gold watch, given in appreciation for his fifty years’ of service to the City of Pittsburgh. He lifted the window screen and pressed his head against the oval window in the side of the plane. The glass was cold against his papery skin. Somewhere out in the darkness the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia rose up from the land. He looked hard but couldn’t see them.

He pulled the screen back down, more sharply than he’d intended, and glanced over at his seatmates. They didn’t react to the noise. Next to him, sat a thin, college- aged girl who had squeezed herself into the middle seat, jammed her earbuds into her ears, and closed her eyes, lost in her music; beside her, a businessman, mid-level management, no higher, judging by the wrinkled suit and battered briefcase. Like a good business traveler, he used the flight to catch up on his sleep. His head lolled back on the headrest and his leg dangled into the aisle.

The man coughed into his fist and remembered the last time he had flown. It had been almost ten years. His youngest daughter and her husband, the struggling actor, had flown him and his wife out to Los Angeles to be there for the birth of their first child—his fourth grandchild, but the first girl. Maya had entered the world squealing and, at least based on the weekly phone calls he had with her mother, it seemed she hadn’t ever stopped. He chuckled to himself at the thought and immediately felt his eyes well up. He blinked and twisted the thin gold band on his ring finger. His mind turned to his Rosa. Fifty-two years together.

He hacked again and dug a handkerchief out of his pocket to wipe his mouth. After folding the white cloth back into a careful square, he checked his watch again, fumbled with the smartphone on his lap, squinted at it to confirm the coordinates were correct, and hit SEND. Then Angelo Calvaruso sat back, closed his eyes, and relaxed—completely relaxed—for the first time in weeks.

Two minutes later, Hemisphere Air Flight No. 1667, a Boeing 737 en route from Washington National to Dallas-Fort Worth International, slammed into the side of a mountain at full speed and exploded in a fiery wave of metal and burning flesh.

**********

The offices of Prescott & Talbott Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Sasha McCandless blew the eyeshadow residue off the tiny mirror of the makeup palette she kept in the top left drawer of her desk and checked her reflection. The drawer was her home away from home. It held a travel toothbrush and toothpaste, a tin of mints, an unopened box of condoms, makeup, a spare pair of contact lenses, apair of glasses, and a brush. She smiled at herself and opened the drawer again, tore open the box, and popped a condom into her beaded handbag.

She shrugged out of the gray cashmere cardigan she’d worn over her black sheath dress all day and kicked off her pumps. She dug around in the credenza behind her desk until she found her fun shoes under a pile of discarded draft briefs, destined for the shredder. She pushed the papers aside and pulled out her shoes. She was wrestling with the tiny red strap on her left stiletto when she heard the ping of an e- mail hitting her in-box.

“No, no, no,” she moaned, as she slowly straightened. She had not had a proper date in weeks. She hoped against hope that the e-mail would reveal no emergency motions, no ranting clients, no last-minute calls to substitute for a deposition in Omaha, or Detroit, or New Orleans.

She needed a steak, a bottle of overpriced red wine, and candlelight. She did not need another night of lukewarm Chinese takeout at her desk.

Almost afraid to look, she clicked on the envelope icon and breathed out, smiling. It was just a Google news alert about a client. She had set up news alerts for all the clients she worked for. It always impressed the partners when she knew what was going on with their clients before they did. Scared them a little, too.

Hemisphere Air was Peterson’s biggest client. She opened the e-mail to see why it was in the news. Maybe a merger? It was one of the healthier airlines and had been looking to pick off a smaller competitor, especially after Sasha and Peterson had gotten it out of that little antitrust mess.

Sasha’s green eyes widened and then fell as she scanned the e-mail. Flight 1667, three-quarters full, en route from D.C. to Dallas, had just crashed in Virginia, killing all 156 people onboard.

She wriggled out of the party shoes and picked up the phone to ruin her date’s night. Then she dialed Peterson’s mobile number to ruin his.

**********

Noah Peterson’s home phone rang at almost the same moment his cell phone began to blare out some unrecognizable piece of classical music in the public domain. Both sat on his bedside table. Noah didn’t lift his head from his magazine.

Laura waited a minute to see if he would move. He didn’t, so she sighed deeply, placed a bookmark in her novel, and reached over to shake his arm. Noah had developed a habit of dozing off while reading in bed. Laura had no idea how he found that position comfortable enough for sleeping, and she didn’t understand why he was so tired all the time lately. He’d always kept long hours at the office, but the pace seemed to be getting to him more these days.

“Noah, phone. Phones, actually.” She shook his forearm harder.

Noah started and pushed his reading glasses, which had slid down his nose, back up to the bridge. He grabbed his cell phone and passed the house phone to Laura to deal with. Squinting at the display, he recognized Sasha McCandless’ office number.

“Mac, slow down,” he said over the torrent of words pouring out of his senior associate. Then he sat, silent, listening, his shoulders sagging under the weight of what Sasha was saying.

Laura tugged on his sleeve, covering the mouthpiece with her hand, and stage whispered, “It’s Bob Metz.”

Noah nodded. Metz was the general counsel of Hemisphere Air.

“Mac, Metz is on my home line. Stay put. Make some coffee. I’ll see you soon.” He flipped the phone shut.

Laura handed him the house phone and he headed into his closet to dress while he placated the troubled man on the other end of the line.

Soft warm light puddled down from the brass-armed sconces that bracketed each side of the headboard, bathing Laura in a romantic glow. She’d paid a princely sum for that attractive lighting, but it was rarely used for its intended purpose. In hindsight, reading light would have been more useful. She scooted over to claim the center of the king bed with its high-thread count sheets and cashmere blankets; it sounded like she would have the luxury all to herself tonight. Again. She opened her book to the marked spot to resume her reading.

 

CHAPTER 2

Bethesda, Maryland

Jerry Irwin sat in his dark office, the only light the glow of his computer monitor. He tapped out a quick message: Demo completed successfully, as we are sure you’ve heard. Second display to occur on Friday. Interested parties to submit confidential bids by midnight Friday.

Irwin read it over twice to make sure it struck the right tone: succinct and confident, but not brash or boastful. Satisfied, he ran the concealment program and sent it out to a select list.

He powered off the computer and rose from his ergonomic desk chair, whistling tunelessly. It wouldn’t be appropriate to celebrate until the bids were in and the winner had paid, but he thought a glass of good scotch was in order.

 

 

Irreparable Harm (A Legal Thriller) is available for purchase at:

Amazon Kindle for $2.99

Amazon UK

 

Connect with Melissa F. Miller:

 

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...