THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Anne of Green Gables Collection: 12 Books, Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside, Chronicles of Avonlea, PLUS MORE!, Lucy M. Montgomery {$0.99}

Sponsored Post

Lucy M. Montgomery’s Frugal Find Under Nine:

Description:

Doma Publishing presents to you The Anne of Green Gables Collection, which has been designed and formatted specifically for your Amazon Kindle. Unlike other e-book editions, the text and chapters are perfectly set up to match the layout and feel of a physical copy, rather than being haphazardly thrown together for a quick release.

This edition also comes with a linked Table of Contents for both the list of included books and their respective chapters. Navigation couldn’t be easier.Purchase this Anne of Green Gables Series and treat yourself to the following list of works featuring the lovable Anne Shirley and writen by L. M. Montgomery:Anne of Green Gables Series, Anne Shirley’s age: 

  • Anne of Green Gables, (1908), 11-16
  • Anne of Avonlea, (1909), 16-18
  • Anne of the Island, (1915), 18-22
  • Anne’s House of Dreams, (1917), 25-27
  • Rainbow Valley, (1919), 41
  • Rilla of Ingleside, (1921), 49-53

Related books featuring Anne Shirley:

  • Chronicles of Avonlea (1912)
  • Further Chronicles of Avonlea (1920)
Poetry Collection:

  • The Watchman, and Other Poems

*BONUS other works by Lucy Maud Montgomery:

  • Kilmeny of the Orchard (1910)
  • The Story Girl (1911)
  • The Golden Road(1913)

Note: This Series is missing Anne of The Ingleside and Anne of Windy Poplars. Unfortunately, the rights for these two books aren’t yet available for Kindle publishing. To make up for it, we also included Bonus Books of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and Call of the Wild by Jack London. Enjoy!

Thank you for choosing Doma House Publishing. We look forward to creating many more affordable Kindle Classics for you to enjoy!

 

Accolade:

“This is a great compilation of 11 Anne of Green Gables books! I chose this edition after sampling various other less quality versions on Amazon. The eBook is very well formatted and reads like a charm on my Kindle 2. As a long-time Anne of Green Gables reader, having this compilation is great for when I feel like revisiting Anne of Avonlea or Anne’s House of Dreams. These are truly wonderful stories and you just get lost in the world of Green Gables thanks to Lucy Maud Montgomery’s fantastic use of imagery.” A.S. Belleview

“This collection contains some of famed Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery’s best work, including the first six novels about her incomparable character, the imaginative red-haired orphan Anne Shirley, who grew up on the Prince Edward Island farm of Green Gables.

“Anne of Green Gables” is the introduction to Montgomery’s heroine, who comes to a bachelor farmer and his spinster sister by mistake, and ends up making a family out of them. The novels included in this collection cover her childhood, her time as a young school marm, her college romance, the early years of her marriage to a country doctor, and the raising of her many children. The concluding novel centers on the coming of age of Anne’s youngest daughter during the difficult days of the First World War.” D. S. Thurlow

“If you have downloaded the free editions of these books on your Kindle before, you have probably noticed the poor formatting and lack of Table of Contents which makes navigation difficult. This Collection has been formatted to match the layout and quality you can expect with a quality printed edition, and also includes linked Tables of Contents to navigate through the different books and their respective chapters. For a few dollars, it is definitely worth the price…”

 

Amazon Reader Reviews:

Anne of Green Gables Collection currently has an Amazon Reader Review rating of 4.6 stars, with 167 reviews. Read the reviews here.

 

An excerpt from Anne of Green Gables Collection:

Book 1 – Anne of Green Gables – by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies’ eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde’s Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde’s door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

There are plenty of people in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbor’s business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she “ran” the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday-school, and was the strongest prop of the Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting “cotton warp” quilts—she had knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices—and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangular peninsula jutting out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel’s all-seeing eye.

She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde—a meek little man whom Avonlea people called “Rachel Lynde’s husband”—was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blair’s store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half-past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

Had it been any other man in Avonlea, Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn’t happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make nothing of it and her afternoon’s enjoyment was spoiled.

“I’ll just step over to Green Gables after tea and find out from Marilla where he’s gone and why,” the worthy woman finally concluded. “He doesn’t generally go to town this time of year and he NEVER visits; if he’d run out of turnip seed he wouldn’t dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn’t driving fast enough to be going for a doctor. Yet something must have happened since last night to start him off. I’m clean puzzled, that’s what, and I won’t know a minute’s peace of mind or conscience until I know what has taken Matthew Cuthbert out of Avonlea today.”

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big, rambling, orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter of a mile up the road from Lynde’s Hollow. To be sure, the long lane made it a good deal further. Matthew Cuthbert’s father, as shy and silent as his son after him, had got as far away as he possibly could from his fellow men without actually retreating into the woods when he founded his homestead. Green Gables was built at the furthest edge of his cleared land and there it was to this day, barely visible from the main road along which all the other Avonlea houses were so sociably situated. Mrs. Rachel Lynde did not call living in such a place LIVING at all.

“It’s just STAYING, that’s what,” she said as she stepped along the deep-rutted, grassy lane bordered with wild rose bushes. “It’s no wonder Matthew and Marilla are both a little odd, living away back here by themselves. Trees aren’t much company, though dear knows if they were there’d be enough of them. I’d ruther look at people. To be sure, they seem contented enough; but then, I suppose, they’re used to it. A body can get used to anything, even to being hanged, as the Irishman said.”

With this Mrs. Rachel stepped out of the lane into the backyard of Green Gables. Very green and neat and precise was that yard, set about on one side with great patriarchal willows and the other with prim Lombardies. Not a stray stick nor stone was to be seen, for Mrs. Rachel would have seen it if there had been. Privately she was of the opinion that Marilla Cuthbert swept that yard over as often as she swept her house. One could have eaten a meal off the ground without overbrimming the proverbial peck of dirt.

Mrs. Rachel rapped smartly at the kitchen door and stepped in when bidden to do so. The kitchen at Green Gables was a cheerful apartment—or would have been cheerful if it had not been so painfully clean as to give it something of the appearance of an unused parlor. Its windows looked east and west; through the west one, looking out on the back yard, came a flood of mellow June sunlight; but the east one, whence you got a glimpse of the bloom white cherry-trees in the left orchard and nodding, slender birches down in the hollow by the brook, was greened over by a tangle of vines. Here sat Marilla Cuthbert, when she sat at all, always slightly distrustful of sunshine, which seemed to her too dancing and irresponsible a thing for a world which was meant to be taken seriously; and here she sat now, knitting, and the table behind her was laid for supper.

Mrs. Rachel, before she had fairly closed the door, had taken a mental note of everything that was on that table. There were three plates laid, so that Marilla must be expecting some one home with Matthew to tea; but the dishes were everyday dishes and there was only crab-apple preserves and one kind of cake, so that the expected company could not be any particular company. Yet what of Matthew’s white collar and the sorrel mare? Mrs. Rachel was getting fairly dizzy with this unusual mystery about quiet, unmysterious Green Gables.

“Good evening, Rachel,” Marilla said briskly. “This is a real fine evening, isn’t it? Won’t you sit down? How are all your folks?”

Something that for lack of any other name might be called friendship existed and always had existed between Marilla Cuthbert and Mrs. Rachel, in spite of—or perhaps because of—their dissimilarity.

Marilla was a tall, thin woman, with angles and without curves; her dark hair showed some gray streaks and was always twisted up in a hard little knot behind with two wire hairpins stuck aggressively through it. She looked like a woman of narrow experience and rigid conscience, which she was; but there was a saving something about her mouth which, if it had been ever so slightly developed, might have been considered indicative of a sense of humor.

“We’re all pretty well,” said Mrs. Rachel. “I was kind of afraid YOU weren’t, though, when I saw Matthew starting off today. I thought maybe he was going to the doctor’s.”

Marilla’s lips twitched understandingly. She had expected Mrs. Rachel up; she had known that the sight of Matthew jaunting off so unaccountably would be too much for her neighbor’s curiosity.

“Oh, no, I’m quite well although I had a bad headache yesterday,” she said. “Matthew went to Bright River. We’re getting a little boy from an orphan asylum in Nova Scotia and he’s coming on the train tonight.”

If Marilla had said that Matthew had gone to Bright River to meet a kangaroo from Australia Mrs. Rachel could not have been more astonished. She was actually stricken dumb for five seconds. It was unsupposable that Marilla was making fun of her, but Mrs. Rachel was almost forced to suppose it.

“Are you in earnest, Marilla?” she demanded when voice returned to her.

“Yes, of course,” said Marilla, as if getting boys from orphan asylums in Nova Scotia were part of the usual spring work on any well-regulated Avonlea farm instead of being an unheard of innovation.

Mrs. Rachel felt that she had received a severe mental jolt. She thought in exclamation points. A boy! Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of all people adopting a boy! From an orphan asylum! Well, the world was certainly turning upside down! She would be surprised at nothing after this! Nothing!

“What on earth put such a notion into your head?” she demanded disapprovingly.

This had been done without her advice being asked, and must perforce be disapproved…

 

Anne of Green Gables Collection is available for purchase at:

Amazon Kindle for $0.99


Connect with Lucy M. Montgomery:

Author Website: twitter.com/domapublishing

THE FRUGAL FIND OF THE DAY: Anne of Green Gables Collection: 12 Books, Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne’s House of Dreams, Rainbow Valley, Rilla of Ingleside, Chronicles of Avonlea, PLUS MORE!, Lucy M. Montgomery {$0.99}

Sponsored Post

Lucy M. Montgomery’s Frugal Find Under Nine:

Description:

Doma Publishing presents to you The Anne of Green Gables Collection, which has been designed and formatted specifically for your Amazon Kindle. Unlike other e-book editions, the text and chapters are perfectly set up to match the layout and feel of a physical copy, rather than being haphazardly thrown together for a quick release.

This edition also comes with a linked Table of Contents for both the list of included books and their respective chapters. Navigation couldn’t be easier.Purchase this Anne of Green Gables Series and treat yourself to the following list of works featuring the lovable Anne Shirley and writen by L. M. Montgomery:

Anne of Green Gables Series, Anne Shirley’s age: 

  • Anne of Green Gables, (1908), 11-16
  • Anne of Avonlea, (1909), 16-18
  • Anne of the Island, (1915), 18-22
  • Anne’s House of Dreams, (1917), 25-27
  • Rainbow Valley, (1919), 41
  • Rilla of Ingleside, (1921), 49-53

Related books featuring Anne Shirley:

  • Chronicles of Avonlea (1912)
  • Further Chronicles of Avonlea (1920)
Poetry Collection:

  • The Watchman, and Other Poems

*BONUS other works by Lucy Maud Montgomery:

  • Kilmeny of the Orchard (1910)
  • The Story Girl (1911)
  • The Golden Road(1913)

Note: This Series is missing Anne of The Ingleside and Anne of Windy Poplars. Unfortunately, the rights for these two books aren’t yet available for Kindle publishing. To make up for it, we also included Bonus Books of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and Call of the Wild by Jack London. Enjoy!

Thank you for choosing Doma House Publishing. We look forward to creating many more affordable Kindle Classics for you to enjoy!

 

Accolade:

“This is a great compilation of 11 Anne of Green Gables books! I chose this edition after sampling various other less quality versions on Amazon. The eBook is very well formatted and reads like a charm on my Kindle 2. As a long-time Anne of Green Gables reader, having this compilation is great for when I feel like revisiting Anne of Avonlea or Anne’s House of Dreams. These are truly wonderful stories and you just get lost in the world of Green Gables thanks to Lucy Maud Montgomery’s fantastic use of imagery.” A.S. Belleview

“This collection contains some of famed Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery’s best work, including the first six novels about her incomparable character, the imaginative red-haired orphan Anne Shirley, who grew up on the Prince Edward Island farm of Green Gables.

“Anne of Green Gables” is the introduction to Montgomery’s heroine, who comes to a bachelor farmer and his spinster sister by mistake, and ends up making a family out of them. The novels included in this collection cover her childhood, her time as a young school marm, her college romance, the early years of her marriage to a country doctor, and the raising of her many children. The concluding novel centers on the coming of age of Anne’s youngest daughter during the difficult days of the First World War.” D. S. Thurlow

“If you have downloaded the free editions of these books on your Kindle before, you have probably noticed the poor formatting and lack of Table of Contents which makes navigation difficult. This Collection has been formatted to match the layout and quality you can expect with a quality printed edition, and also includes linked Tables of Contents to navigate through the different books and their respective chapters. For a few dollars, it is definitely worth the price…”

Amazon Reader Reviews:

Anne of Green Gables Collection currently has an Amazon Reader Review rating of 4.6 stars, with 167 reviews. Read the reviews here.

 

An excerpt from Anne of Green Gables Collection:

Book 1 – Anne of Green Gables – by Lucy Maud Montgomery

Mrs. Rachel Lynde lived just where the Avonlea main road dipped down into a little hollow, fringed with alders and ladies’ eardrops and traversed by a brook that had its source away back in the woods of the old Cuthbert place; it was reputed to be an intricate, headlong brook in its earlier course through those woods, with dark secrets of pool and cascade; but by the time it reached Lynde’s Hollow it was a quiet, well-conducted little stream, for not even a brook could run past Mrs. Rachel Lynde’s door without due regard for decency and decorum; it probably was conscious that Mrs. Rachel was sitting at her window, keeping a sharp eye on everything that passed, from brooks and children up, and that if she noticed anything odd or out of place she would never rest until she had ferreted out the whys and wherefores thereof.

There are plenty of people in Avonlea and out of it, who can attend closely to their neighbor’s business by dint of neglecting their own; but Mrs. Rachel Lynde was one of those capable creatures who can manage their own concerns and those of other folks into the bargain. She was a notable housewife; her work was always done and well done; she “ran” the Sewing Circle, helped run the Sunday-school, and was the strongest prop of the Church Aid Society and Foreign Missions Auxiliary. Yet with all this Mrs. Rachel found abundant time to sit for hours at her kitchen window, knitting “cotton warp” quilts—she had knitted sixteen of them, as Avonlea housekeepers were wont to tell in awed voices—and keeping a sharp eye on the main road that crossed the hollow and wound up the steep red hill beyond. Since Avonlea occupied a little triangular peninsula jutting out into the Gulf of St. Lawrence with water on two sides of it, anybody who went out of it or into it had to pass over that hill road and so run the unseen gauntlet of Mrs. Rachel’s all-seeing eye.

She was sitting there one afternoon in early June. The sun was coming in at the window warm and bright; the orchard on the slope below the house was in a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom, hummed over by a myriad of bees. Thomas Lynde—a meek little man whom Avonlea people called “Rachel Lynde’s husband”—was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs. Rachel knew that he ought because she had heard him tell Peter Morrison the evening before in William J. Blair’s store over at Carmody that he meant to sow his turnip seed the next afternoon. Peter had asked him, of course, for Matthew Cuthbert had never been known to volunteer information about anything in his whole life.

And yet here was Matthew Cuthbert, at half-past three on the afternoon of a busy day, placidly driving over the hollow and up the hill; moreover, he wore a white collar and his best suit of clothes, which was plain proof that he was going out of Avonlea; and he had the buggy and the sorrel mare, which betokened that he was going a considerable distance. Now, where was Matthew Cuthbert going and why was he going there?

Had it been any other man in Avonlea, Mrs. Rachel, deftly putting this and that together, might have given a pretty good guess as to both questions. But Matthew so rarely went from home that it must be something pressing and unusual which was taking him; he was the shyest man alive and hated to have to go among strangers or to any place where he might have to talk. Matthew, dressed up with a white collar and driving in a buggy, was something that didn’t happen often. Mrs. Rachel, ponder as she might, could make nothing of it and her afternoon’s enjoyment was spoiled.

“I’ll just step over to Green Gables after tea and find out from Marilla where he’s gone and why,” the worthy woman finally concluded. “He doesn’t generally go to town this time of year and he NEVER visits; if he’d run out of turnip seed he wouldn’t dress up and take the buggy to go for more; he wasn’t driving fast enough to be going for a doctor. Yet something must have happened since last night to start him off. I’m clean puzzled, that’s what, and I won’t know a minute’s peace of mind or conscience until I know what has taken Matthew Cuthbert out of Avonlea today.”

Accordingly after tea Mrs. Rachel set out; she had not far to go; the big, rambling, orchard-embowered house where the Cuthberts lived was a scant quarter of a mile up the road from Lynde’s Hollow. To be sure, the long lane made it a good deal further. Matthew Cuthbert’s father, as shy and silent as his son after him, had got as far away as he possibly could from his fellow men without actually retreating into the woods when he founded his homestead. Green Gables was built at the furthest edge of his cleared land and there it was to this day, barely visible from the main road along which all the other Avonlea houses were so sociably situated. Mrs. Rachel Lynde did not call living in such a place LIVING at all.

“It’s just STAYING, that’s what,” she said as she stepped along the deep-rutted, grassy lane bordered with wild rose bushes. “It’s no wonder Matthew and Marilla are both a little odd, living away back here by themselves. Trees aren’t much company, though dear knows if they were there’d be enough of them. I’d ruther look at people. To be sure, they seem contented enough; but then, I suppose, they’re used to it. A body can get used to anything, even to being hanged, as the Irishman said.”

With this Mrs. Rachel stepped out of the lane into the backyard of Green Gables. Very green and neat and precise was that yard, set about on one side with great patriarchal willows and the other with prim Lombardies. Not a stray stick nor stone was to be seen, for Mrs. Rachel would have seen it if there had been. Privately she was of the opinion that Marilla Cuthbert swept that yard over as often as she swept her house. One could have eaten a meal off the ground without overbrimming the proverbial peck of dirt.

Mrs. Rachel rapped smartly at the kitchen door and stepped in when bidden to do so. The kitchen at Green Gables was a cheerful apartment—or would have been cheerful if it had not been so painfully clean as to give it something of the appearance of an unused parlor. Its windows looked east and west; through the west one, looking out on the back yard, came a flood of mellow June sunlight; but the east one, whence you got a glimpse of the bloom white cherry-trees in the left orchard and nodding, slender birches down in the hollow by the brook, was greened over by a tangle of vines. Here sat Marilla Cuthbert, when she sat at all, always slightly distrustful of sunshine, which seemed to her too dancing and irresponsible a thing for a world which was meant to be taken seriously; and here she sat now, knitting, and the table behind her was laid for supper.

Mrs. Rachel, before she had fairly closed the door, had taken a mental note of everything that was on that table. There were three plates laid, so that Marilla must be expecting some one home with Matthew to tea; but the dishes were everyday dishes and there was only crab-apple preserves and one kind of cake, so that the expected company could not be any particular company. Yet what of Matthew’s white collar and the sorrel mare? Mrs. Rachel was getting fairly dizzy with this unusual mystery about quiet, unmysterious Green Gables.

“Good evening, Rachel,” Marilla said briskly. “This is a real fine evening, isn’t it? Won’t you sit down? How are all your folks?”

Something that for lack of any other name might be called friendship existed and always had existed between Marilla Cuthbert and Mrs. Rachel, in spite of—or perhaps because of—their dissimilarity.

Marilla was a tall, thin woman, with angles and without curves; her dark hair showed some gray streaks and was always twisted up in a hard little knot behind with two wire hairpins stuck aggressively through it. She looked like a woman of narrow experience and rigid conscience, which she was; but there was a saving something about her mouth which, if it had been ever so slightly developed, might have been considered indicative of a sense of humor.

“We’re all pretty well,” said Mrs. Rachel. “I was kind of afraid YOU weren’t, though, when I saw Matthew starting off today. I thought maybe he was going to the doctor’s.”

Marilla’s lips twitched understandingly. She had expected Mrs. Rachel up; she had known that the sight of Matthew jaunting off so unaccountably would be too much for her neighbor’s curiosity.

“Oh, no, I’m quite well although I had a bad headache yesterday,” she said. “Matthew went to Bright River. We’re getting a little boy from an orphan asylum in Nova Scotia and he’s coming on the train tonight.”

If Marilla had said that Matthew had gone to Bright River to meet a kangaroo from Australia Mrs. Rachel could not have been more astonished. She was actually stricken dumb for five seconds. It was unsupposable that Marilla was making fun of her, but Mrs. Rachel was almost forced to suppose it.

“Are you in earnest, Marilla?” she demanded when voice returned to her.

“Yes, of course,” said Marilla, as if getting boys from orphan asylums in Nova Scotia were part of the usual spring work on any well-regulated Avonlea farm instead of being an unheard of innovation.

Mrs. Rachel felt that she had received a severe mental jolt. She thought in exclamation points. A boy! Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of all people adopting a boy! From an orphan asylum! Well, the world was certainly turning upside down! She would be surprised at nothing after this! Nothing!

“What on earth put such a notion into your head?” she demanded disapprovingly.

This had been done without her advice being asked, and must perforce be disapproved…

 

Anne of Green Gables Collection is available for purchase at:

Amazon Kindle for $0.99


Connect with Lucy M. Montgomery:

Author Website: twitter.com/domapublishing

KINDLE DAILY DEAL: Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes is Just $2.99 Today Only!

Daniel Keyes wrote little SF but is highly regarded for one classic, Flowers for Algernon. As a 1959 novella it won a Hugo Award; the 1966 novel-length expansion won a Nebula. The Oscar-winning movie adaptation Charly (1968) also spawned a 1980 Broadway musical.

Following his doctor’s instructions, engaging simpleton Charlie Gordon tells his own story in semi-literate “progris riports.” He dimly wants to better himself, but with an IQ of 68 can’t even beat the laboratory mouse Algernon at maze-solving:

I dint feel bad because I watched Algernon and I lernd how to finish the amaze even if it takes me along time.I dint know mice were so smart.

Algernon is extra-clever thanks to an experimental brain operation so far tried only on animals. Charlie eagerly volunteers as the first human subject. After frustrating delays and agonies of concentration, the effects begin to show and the reports steadily improve: “Punctuation, is? fun!” But getting smarter brings cruel shocks, as Charlie realizes that his merry “friends” at the bakery where he sweeps the floor have all along been laughing at him, never with him. The IQ rise continues, taking him steadily past the human average to genius level and beyond, until he’s as intellectually alone as the old, foolish Charlie ever was–and now painfully aware of it. Then, ominously, the smart mouse Algernon begins to deteriorate…

Flowers for Algernon is a timeless tear-jerker with a terrific emotional impact. –David Langford

What readers are saying:

“A tale that is convincing, suspenseful and touching.”–The New York Times

“An ingeniously touching story . . . Moving . . . Intensely real.”–The Baltimore Sun

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 4.5 stars {539 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Flowers for Algernon for $2.99* from Amazon

*Price goes back up to $12.06 tomorrow!

KINDLE DAILY DEAL: The Princess Bride by William Goldman is $1.99 Today Only!

William Goldman’s modern fantasy classic is a simple, exceptional story about quests—for riches, revenge, power, and, of course, true love—that’s thrilling and timeless.

Anyone who lived through the 1980s may find it impossible—inconceivable, even—to equate The Princess Bride with anything other than the sweet, celluloid romance of Westley and Buttercup, but the film is only a fraction of the ingenious storytelling you’ll find in these pages. Rich in character and satire, the novel is set in 1941 and framed cleverly as an “abridged” retelling of a centuries-old tale set in the fabled country of Florin that’s home to “Beasts of all natures and descriptions. Pain. Death. Brave men. Coward men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passions.”

What readers are saying:

“[Goldman's] swashbuckling fable is nutball funny . . . A ‘classic’ medieval melodrama that sounds like all the Saturday serials you ever saw feverishly reworked by the Marx Brothers.” –Newsweek
“One of the funniest, most original, and deeply moving novels I have read in a long time.” –Los Angeles Times

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 4.5 stars {803 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase The Princess Bride for $1.99* from Amazon

*Price goes back up to $8.10 tomorrow!

 

A Child al Confino, Eric Lamet {FREE!}

The Poignant Memoir of One Boy’s Survival and Triumph During the Holocaust

Eric Lamet was only seven years old when the Nazis invaded Vienna—and changed his life and the lives of all European Jews forever. Five days after Hitler marched in, Eric Lamet and his parents fled for their lives. Unable to remain together, the family split—he and his mother hid out in Italy, while his father returned to his native Poland and an even darker fate.

In this remarkable feat of memory and imagination, Lamet recreates the Italy he knew from the perspective of the scared and lonely child he once was. We not only see the hardships and terrors faced by foreign Jews in Fascist Italy, but also the friends Eric makes and his mother’s valiant efforts to make a home for him.

In a style as original as his story, the author vividly recalls a terrible time yet imbues his recollections with humor, humanity, and wit. With a rare compassion toward friend and foe alike, little Eric Lamet shows us that there is light to be found in the darkest places—and that we should remember the good as well as the bad.

What readers are saying:

A literary masterpiece [about] the miracle of survival . . . . –RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ

The average Amazon reader review is currently 4.5 stars {32 reviews}.

Gobble Up These Classic Frugal Freebies!

Gobble up these classic Frugal Freebies before you enjoy your turkey!


 

 

The Velveteen Rabbit: Vook Classics, Margery Williams {FREE!}

The Velveteen Rabbit or How Toys Become Real is a children’s novel written by Margery Williams and illustrated by William Nicholson. Vook has enhanced this classic children’s story with videos of adorable rabbits. The story chronicles the story of a stuffed rabbit and his quest to become real through the love of his owner. The book was first published in 1922.

What readers are saying:

“This is a charming classic for children, but it is entertaining and touching for adults as well.”

The average Amazon reader review is currently 5 stars {1 review}.

The Time Machine, H.G. Wells (FREE!)

The Time Traveller, a dreamer obsessed with traveling through time, builds himself a time machine and, much to his surprise, travels over 800,000 years into the future. He lands in the year 802701: the world has been transformed by a society living in apparent harmony and bliss, but as the Traveler stays in the future he discovers a hidden barbaric and depraved subterranean class. Wells’s transparent commentary on the capitalist society was an instant bestseller and launched the time-travel genre.

What readers are saying:

“A Timeless Classic”

“Past and present masterpiece”

The average Amazon Reader Review is currently 4 stars {473 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase The Time Machine for FREE from Amazon

Midnight Cowboy, James Leo Herlihy {FREE!}

A gritty but compassionate novel about an ingenuous young man’s confrontation with the unpleasant realities of urban life, Midnight Cowboy is an under-appreciated classic of postwar American literature.

What readers are saying:

“A neglected minor classic; highly recommended.”

“Herlihy’s gift to American literature was this novel.”

“Masterful sketch of lives lived beneath the radar of society”

The average customer review is currently 5 stars {18 reviews}.

Click here to read more about and purchase Midnight Cowboy for FREE from Amazon

Gobble Up These Classic Frugal Freebies!

Happy Thanksgiving Frugal eReaders!  
Gobble up these classic Frugal Freebies before you enjoy your turkey!
The Phantom of the OperaBeauty and the BeastGreat Expectations
The Merry Adventures of Robin HoodTwenty Thousand Leagues under the SeaThe Legend of Sleepy Hollow
A Christmas CarolCrime and PunishmentThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz
Hope you have a wonderful day full of food and loved ones.
~Elizabeth
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